100,000 salmon released into Atlantis Subsea project

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First-time biomass of this size has been put in a pen and submerged 30 meters below the surface, says aquaculture equipment supplier.

AKVA writes that its Atlantis Sub Sea project, a collaboration between salmon farmer SinkabergHansen and cage net maker Egersund, has put the second round of fish into the sea in at a site in Central Norway.

The goal is to have the pen submerged as much as possible and at the surface as little as possible. This would help in areas that have rough surface conditions and would cause fewer sea lice infestations.

SalmonBusiness reported that the first fish were deployed in its submersible pen last May.

The fish, which weigh 3 kilos, were treated for lice before being released into the pen and will reside in Atlantis until harvesting this summer.

Salmon is submerged 30 meters below the surface. PHOTO: Trude Olafsen

“The project has done a few changes since the first round of fish, including the instalment of load shackles to get a better overview of how the environmental forces are impacting the pen construction. The control system with associated technology has been built into a container to allow easy transfer between barges,” wrote AKVA.

“The operation was well-planned and took place without any issues. The fish quickly calmed down and resumed a good pattern of movement inside the pen,” said Project Manager Trude Olafsen.

The project has had a few changes since the first round of fish, including the instalment of load shackles to get a better overview of how the environmental forces are impacting the pen construction. The control system with associated technology has been built into a container to allow easier transfer between barges.

Project Manager Olafsen said he was satisfied with this week’s operation. With 100,000 fish in the pen, he was hopeful the project is getting close to a normal operational situation.

“Everyone involved did a great job during the operation and the fish will now be closely monitored by SinkabergHansen’s skilled vets and operational personnel. The project has reached a new milestone,” explained Olafsen.