Falkland Islands to look into developing salmon farms

News
3041

The South Atlantic archipelago is looking into preliminary studies into salmon farming on it’s shores.

It’s cold, but not cold enough for icebergs and it’s sheltered unlike Argentina’s exposed coastline of high waves. So is it time for the Falkland Islands to start farming salmon? According to mercopress, the Executive Council of the Falkland Islands have discussed a proposal for just that.

The Shag Rocks between the Falkland Islands where a meeting of cold and warmer waters occurs PHOTO: David Stanley @Flickr

Pisco ApS
The proposal is seeking authorisation for Government officers to negotiate a Letter of Intent with the Danish company, Pisco ApS, to evaluate whether conditions in the Islands would be adequate to support the development of salmon fish farming.

An environmental impact assessment as well as an socio-economic impact assessment and the impact of the proposed development on the Falkland Islands economy will be undertaken. On completion of this The Executive Council agreed that a Letter of Intent could be negotiated.

The islands are remote but well placed for salmon farming PHOTO Google

Talking to the publication,Member of the Legislative Assembly and Portfolio Lead for Natural Resources, Teslyn Barkman, said: “This proposal naturally raises some interest and questions from the public and I would like to reassure people that the decision today is only to proceed with carrying out this in-depth research. No approval has been granted to develop large scale fish farming, instead the Executive Council has agreed that we need to gather this in-depth information before any further discussions can take place“.

Fox Bay
The last time salmon farming research occurred was in 1986 at the second largest settlement on West Falkland, Fox Bay. During the Falklands War, Fox Bay was occupied by Argentine troops but was liberated by HMS Avenger and Royal Marines from 40 Commando on 15 June 1982 and to this day this date is commemorated by residents as their liberation day.

Teslyn Barkman that ”there is a precedent in salmon farming at Fox Bay, but to fully understand the implications of salmon farming on a larger scale, we need to analyse the environmental, sociological and economic impacts that it could present.”