American Aquafarms withdraws legal action over rejected salmon farm application

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American Aquafarms has withdraw its planned legal action over a decision from the Maine Department of Marine Resources (DMR) to reject applications for the company’s planned salmon farm in Frenchman Bay.

The US aquaculture filed the appeal in the Cumberland County Superior Court, asking the court to vacate the state’s decision and allow the original applications to be considered.

The legal challenge came after Maine’s DMR terminated the application for the $300 million American Aquafarms project back in April, telling SalmonBusiness that the company “failed to provide documentation demonstrating that the proposed source of fish/eggs could meet genetic requirements in law.”

The company’s appeals claimed that Maine set an arbitrary four-month deadline for information to approve a Canadian egg source and failed to properly consider another potential source from within the state.

Read more: American Aquafarms appeals Maine’s decision to terminate salmon farm applications

The company’s appeals claimed that Maine set an arbitrary four-month deadline for information to approve a Canadian egg source and failed to properly consider another potential source from within the state.

The stipulation of dismissal filed by American Aquafarms was agreed to by Frenchman Bay United (FBU), a group opposing the company’s planned project. “As an intervenor on behalf of the Maine DMR, Frenchman Bay United agreed to the dismissal of this lawsuit,” FBU Board President Henry Sharpe said in a press release.

Read more: AquaBounty responds after Maine cancels controversial salmon farm application over egg concerns

“We have always believed that DMR made the right decision in refusing to accept the company’s lease applications and that this lawsuit had little merit. We again call on American Aquafarms to end any plans it may have to reapply for permits for this or other destructive and highly polluting projects,” Sharpe added.

“We hope that this is the end for American Aquafarms, but we remain vigilant and ready to challenge any subsequent applications they may file that would jeopardize Maine’s brand: clean water, thriving natural habitats, pristine wilderness, and a robust, owner-operated working waterfront,” Sharpe concluded.

SalmonBusiness has reached out to American Aquafarms for comment.